Archive of Purposes Ethics and Beliefs stories

Philosophy of Education Society Events, Oxford Branch 2014

 

 

14 January 2014

Influencing policy? The example of religious education

Revd Dr John Gay, Dr Janet Orchard (Bristol University) and Dr Alis Oancea

17:00 – 18:30, 15 Norham Gardens, OUDE, Seminar Room J

Convened by Dr Alis Oancea and Dr Liam Gearon, Religion, Philosophy and Education Research Forum

 

6th March 2014

A dialogue between phenomenology and realism in pedagogical and educational research

A symposium supported by the Higher Education Academy, featuring Professor Margaret Archer, Professor Tone Saevi, and Professor David Scott

09:30 – 16:00
15 Norham Gardens,OUDE, Seminar Room A, by prior booking only (via the HEA website)

http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/events/detail/2014/Seminars/Social_Sciences/GEN810_oxford

Conveners: Dr Alis Oancea and David Aldridge (Oxford Brookes)

 

8 April 2014

A lifeworld perspective on learning for the professions

Prof Gloria Dall’Alba

17:00 – 18:30, 15 Norham Gardens, OUDE, Seminar Room D

With its grounding in phenomenology, a lifeworld perspective offers rich and novel resources in researching learning for the professions. This seminar explores some of this potential through foregrounding the importance of our inevitable entwinement with others and things in social practice. It draws upon empirical research on learning in preparation for professional practice. A lifeworld perspective enables us to attend closely to integration of what aspiring professionals know or can do (an epistemological dimension) with how they are learning to be (an ontological dimension). In providing an integrated research framework, this perspective allows us to extend and enhance prevalent research approaches in ways that respond to contemporary challenges in professional practice. 

Gloria Dall’Alba is an Associate Professor in the School of Education at the University of Queensland, Australia. Her research draws upon hermeneutic phenomenology, especially related to higher education pedagogy, professional practice and qualitative inquiry. Her recent books are Learning to be Professionals (Springer) and an edited volume, Exploring Education Through Phenomenology: Diverse Approaches (Wiley-Blackwell).

 

13 May 2014

Reclaiming, reframing solidarity in teacher education

Dr Ruth Heilbronn, Institute of Education, London

17:00 – 18:30, 15 Norham Gardens, OUDE, Seminar Room D

 

3 June 2014

Understanding the University

Prof Ron Barnett, Institute of Education

Harcourt Hill Campus, Oxford Brookes University

 

24 June 2014

Dr Carina Henriksson, Institute of Child Protection Studies, Australian Catholic University

Phenomenology of education – title tbc

17:00 – 18:30, Harcourt Hill Campus, Oxford Brookes University

 

 

 

 

 

Moral Education and the Common School: Building on Wilson’s ‘New Introduction’

School of Education
Research Seminar Series 2013-2014

Moral Education and the Common School: Building on Wilson’s ‘New Introduction’

Dr. Richard Davies (Aberystwyth University)
November 26th, 5-6.30pm
Glasgow Room
In 1990 John Wilson published a single authored response to the multi-authored and multi-disciplinary ‘Introduction to Moral Education’ (Wilson, Williams and Sugarman, 1967). The new introduction purported to set out a systematic approach to moral education suitable for schools. It once again developed his widely used PHIL, KRAT, EMP, etc. terminology. Wilson was ‘…a towering figure in moral education…[his] work has been controversial and distinctive’ (Taylor, 2005) and continues to be so in moral education research and practice. A matter recognised in the posthumous award of a memorial lecture at the PESGB annual conference and supported by the Association of Moral Educators.

In this paper I begin by reviewing Wilson’s arguments in the ‘New Introduction’ (Wilson, 1990) before presenting a critique of the main aspects of his work. I conclude with a defence of a virtues approach to ‘moral education’, but claim that such an account is incompatible with the common school. I suggest that in the light of this schools ought to focus on supporting moral education, and one feasible option is to promote an ‘education in moral philosophy’ of the type Wilson suggests. This is, however, not to be confused with ‘moral education’.
Beginning this semester, the SoE will host a series of external speakers as part of the SoE Research Seminar Series. This will run throughout Semester 2 as well, and will cover a range of topics that we hope will be interesting to all members of academic staff. If colleagues have ideas for particular speakers that they would like to invite for next semester, please contact Patrick Alexander (palexander@brookes.ac.uk). A full schedule for the seminar series will be posted in due course on the SoE Blog and in the Glasgow Room.

This lecturer has been organised in conjunction with the Oxford Branch of the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain.

Flyer: SoE Research Seminar Poster 26 Nov Richard Davies

Wednesday lunch Time Seminar Series

Beginning on 27th November 2013, the School of Education will be hosting a weekly lunchtime research seminar on Wednesdays, 12-1pm, in the Glasgow Room. The intention of the seminar series is to provide an informal space for discussion and dialogue in which staff can present and share on-going research activities. This is a free and open platform for discussing research, and colleagues are encouraged to bring any research items to the meeting, from raising initial exploratory questions, to seeking advice about developing conceptual ideas, to on-going methodological questions, to fully-formed research presentations. Each session will begin with a short (10-25 minute) presentation from a member of academic staff, followed by discussion. Feel free to bring your lunch!

More information here.

Engaged Reading

 

How much do you read? What do you read? What is your experience of reading?

How does reading for pleasure differ from academic reading? Does the experience of higher education take the pleasure out of reading?

What are the barriers to academic reading? Is reading an uncomfortable experience?

How much do you read for modules? How valuable are module reading lists?

What is your perception of the importance of reading for learning in Higher Education? How do you perceive the connection between reading and academic success?

Does academic literature have the power to transform the reader? What would this mean?

 

The ‘Engaged Reading’ project aims to investigate these questions in collaboration with students at Oxford Brookes University. We want to work with you to develop course materials and approaches that explore the transformational potential of reading.

 

If you are interested in becoming involved in the project, please email David Aldridge: daldridge@brookes.ac.uk

Funded Research Scholarship, School of Education, Oxford Brookes University

The School of Education at Oxford Brookes Universty is looking for strong candidates to apply for one three-year, full-time PhD studentship. The studentship is intended for a candidate who will pursue a PhD project that falls broadly within one of the School’s key thematic research areas:

Learning, Identity and Culture
Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment
Childhood, Families and Community
Educational Purposes, Ethics and Beliefs
Partnership, Policy and Leadership

The closing date for applications is 17.00 on Monday 25th November 2013, with interviews being held during the week of 9th December 2013. The start date for the studentship is January 2014.

Further Details

A Laughing Matter? The Role of Humour in Peer Victimization

A Laughing Matter? The Role of Humour in Peer Victimization

On Monday 7th October, 5:00 – 6:30 pm in the Glasgow Room on Harcourt Hill Campus, we will be visited by Sian Jones, a teaching fellow in the Department of Psychology, Social Work and Public Health, Oxford Brookes University.

Sian’s research has involved looking at children’s humour use and how this may be linked to bullying and victimization, and in turn to psychological maladjustment, on an ESRC-funded project in collaboration with Claire Fox (Keele University) and Simon Hunter (University of Strathclyde). A blog detailing the research project activities can be accessed here:

http://esrcbullyingandhumourproject.wordpress.com/

I would like to invite undergraduate students, graduate students and colleagues in education to attend and consider how recent work conducted in psychology can inform educational and pastoral research and practice.

David Aldridge

Critical Realism at Oxford Brookes University

David Aldridge, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy of Education, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

In September 2012 the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, together with the Farmington Institute, sponsored a conference in ‘Critical Realism, Religion and Education’ that was attended by over sixty delegates from around the world, including education practitioners, undergraduates and research students and academics from a wide range of disciplines. The mutual interest of the conference was the question of how issues of religion, reality and truth are to be addressed in educational contexts and communities. Keynote speakers, all of international renown, included Professor Roy Bhaskar, World Scholar at the Institute of Education, University of London and the originator of the philosophy of critical realism, a theoretical approach that is increasingly gaining recognition as a methodological ‘under-labourer’ for research in the social sciences; Professor Alister McGrath, the renowned theologian who began his career as a doctor of science; Professor Ference Marton, the originator of the ‘phenomenographical’ research methodology that has been highly influential in higher education research, as well as the distinction between ‘deep’, ‘strategic’ and ‘superficial’ learning; and Professor Andrew Wright, a leading expert in theological and religious education and the originator of ‘critical religious education’, which draws on Bhaskar’s philosophy.

The aim of the conference was to generate inter-disciplinary discussion and collaboration, and one fruitful outcome is that a volume of papers is now intended with Routledge. Another unanticipated outcome was the discovery of a significant number of colleagues across the university who are also interested in or working directly with critical realism, including Ivan Mitchell in the Business School, Professor Math Noortmann in International Relations and Law, and Johanna Woodcock Ross in Social Work. We have been successful in securing further funding from the Faculty to hold an internal symposium in September 2013 for colleagues and research students who are working with critical realism or interested in doing so. Leading researchers in critical realism will visit the university to form a panel of experts and colleagues will offer short presentations of their work in critical realism for discussion by the group. We plan to follow this symposium with a programme of related activity within and outside the faculty, including a critical realist reading group and the formation of an inter-disciplinary research centre.

Why critical realism makes sense in social science and management studies

Ivan Mitchel (Dept. of Business & Management)
& Math Noortmann (dept. of Social Sciences & School of Law)
Wednesday May 8th, 2013, 12-1.30pm Room E212 at Wheatley
Campus.

How should we make sense of the way the social world is? How should
we consider how the social world should be? Since the mid-twentieth
century, the debate around the ontological status of the social world
and what we can know about it has continued to garner significant
attention in social science and management studies. However, until
fairly recently this debate has predominantly been focused on the
competing paradigms of ‘empirical realism’ and a range of
perspectives which might loosely be termed as ‘postmodernism’. In
this seminar, therefore, we invite people to contemplate the value of
an alternative philosophy that is concerned with deeper
conceptualisations of ‘reality’ and being ‘critical’ – namely, ‘critical
realism’. We will introduce and contextualise the main tenets of the
philosophy and explore its critical distinctiveness as a basis for social
science and management knowledge.

All welcome

Call for Papers – Annual Research Conference

School of Education
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

Call for Papers
Annual Research Conference
What Counts as Educational Research :
What could it be and what is it for?

Friday July 12th 2013
9 – 4 pm

We are expecting a range of presentations from those who might be just setting out on their research journey (and are therefore still in dilemma over ‘what’ and ‘how’) as well as those who will be experienced (and able to share final outcomes and recommendations of a rigorous study or well justified ‘thought’ piece).

If you have any queries about whether your paper would be appropriate or not please contact one of the conference committee.

The conference committee also welcomes symposia from research groups (that is a collection of short papers taking juxtaposed views on a particular issue).

All paper presentations should be 20 mins (with up to 10 minutes for Q & A).
Symposiums should last a total of 1 hour.

Please send in a document with the following information (below) if you intend to present.

It is intended that all papers presented will be collated as a collection and published through the SoE.

Deadline for submission : June 10th (to be emailed to Christine Gahan cgahan@brookes.ac.uk).

Further Information

Funded Research Scholarship, School of Education, Oxford Brookes University

The School of Education at Oxford Brookes Universty is looking for strong candidates to apply for one three-year, full-time PhD studentship. The studentship is intended for a candidate who will pursue a PhD project that falls broadly within one of the School’s key thematic research areas:
Learning, Identity and Culture
Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment
Childhood, Families and Community
Educational Purposes, Ethics and Beliefs
Partnership, Policy and Leadership
The closing date for applications is 17.00 on Monday 4th March 2013, with interviews being held during the week of 25th March 2013.

For further details, please see the further information.